A photograph of the the front of Tecnifibre X-One Biphase in the sand at the beach on a sunny day.

Tecnifibre X-One Biphase String Review & Playtest

15 replies
  1. John Brins
    John Brins says:

    I have used this string for about two years and have found it to be the best string for me. As reported the power is very high and the comfort is amazing. I had some arm discomfort prior to using this string but none since. I have used almost every string in the book over 25 years of tennis and I feel that this truely is the best string next to gut. It’s a little costly but in my opinion well worth it.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi John! Thanks so much for the comment and for sharing your thoughts! It’s great to hear that X-One has been an awesome tennis string for you and even better to hear that it has helped with your arm discomfort. The fact that X-One has performance enhancing qualities along with helping reduce physical discomfort certainly helps make this string stand out from the crowd.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  2. Tietzen
    Tietzen says:

    Jon: I am still playing with half natural gut but will give it a try. It might be great with half gut too. still use the 6.1 I gave you?? best PT

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey, Tietzen. Thanks for stopping by! X-One Biphase is a great synthetic alternative to natural gut and I think it would absolutely worth a try for you. One the great benefits you’d hopefully find using X-One as a hybrid with natural gut is that you should save yourself some cash along the way. As far as the racquet goes, I bought these years ago so you might have me mixed up with another Jon ;)

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  3. Chris Burt
    Chris Burt says:

    I have used it; long term wrist problem that has resolved using a heavier racquet and a multi filiment like this;
    I like the string but believe the Tecnifibre NRG 2 is better; recently ,been using a Yonex poly ,the 125 Tour;no wrist problems and the benefit of a poly; seems to lasts longer. Cheaper too.

    Good string review.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Chris! Thank you for your comment and for your insights – super helpful and always welcome! Really happy to hear that you were able to resolve your wrist problem with a heavier racquet and a multifilament like X-One Biphase. As for NRG2, it’s another fantastic multifilament tennis string from the Tecnifibre family with some similar qualities to X-One.

      As for the Yonex Poly 125 that you’re using, yes I would expect that it’s a more durable tennis string as polyester tennis strings tend to hold that quality. Generally speaking, you’ll end up with more durability and control, but most players will find they sacrifice comfort while also seeing a big drop in power. Of course, that isn’t a bad thing… it really all depends on a player’s expectation of their tennis string and their goals out on the tennis court. Good info and thanks again for sharing your experience.

      ~All the best, Jon

      Reply
  4. Mai
    Mai says:

    I have been playing with NRG 2 18 & X-One Biphase 17, but now I’d like to do a hybrid using these two strings. I am thinking of having X-one be on the mains at 53 and NRG 2 on the crosses at 50. For single string, I play at 50. What do you think? Will this hybrid be too much power?

    PS. I have a persistent tennis elbow and these strings offer me the needed comfort and power.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi there, Mai! Thanks for posting your question! Based on the fact that you have tennis elbow and are looking for a string setup that offers you comfort and power I think stringing X-One Biphase at a lower 17 gauge in the mains and NRG2 18 in the crosses is totally reasonable. You’ll most likely find that this combination continues to offer you high comfort, decent durability with the lower gauge X-One in the mains, and I don’t think you’ll find that the hybrid of these two strings will be overpowering as both strings have a similar power rating.

      A few questions that might help me be a bit more thorough in my answer are:

      1. What is your #1 goal with moving from a single string to a hybrid?
      2. Is there a feature of X-One Biphase and a feature of NRG2 that you enjoyed and therefore were hoping to combine to get the best of both worlds?
      3. What type of racquet are you using?

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
      • Mai
        Mai says:

        Thank you, Jon, for the response. Here are my answers to your questions:

        1. I am hoping that using the NRG2 18 crosses will allow me more spin. That would prevents my shots to go long (The strings come with fair amount of power).

        2. X-One Biphase and NRG2 offer me the comfort I need for elbow problem. I enjoy volley a whole lot more with these strings because of the exceptional feel.

        3. Head Prestigez

        Thank you again, Jon. If there’s a better option for hybrid, please feel free to comment. I Look forward to hearing from you.

        Best wishes,

        Mai

        Reply
        • TennisCompanion
          TennisCompanion says:

          Mai, thanks for getting back to me.

          Personally, I don’t believe stringing X-One and NRG2 as a hybrid setup will provide you with increased spin potential because neither of these strings is inherently geared towards helping players generate spin. If you were looking for more spin my first recommendation would be to maintain X-One Biphase or NRG2 in the crosses of your racquet and then find a polyester tennis string to help with the spin in the mains, but it’s a tradeoff because you will be sacrificing a level of comfort.

          If you were to give this a shot two polyester tennis strings that come to mind are Babolat RPM Blast & Head Lynx. Both are low powered, provide excellent access to spin, and deliver above average comfort relative to other strings in this family.

          On the other hand, if you wanted to keep it in the Tecnifibre family of tennis string I’d suggest you go with Tecnifbire’s Black Code, which is a fantastic string for added spin and constructed to provide a level of comfort. However, I think you’ll find RPM Blast and Lynx to be a bit easier on your arm.

          I realize that might not be the exact answer you’re looking for but I’d rather give you an honest answer based on my experience.

          ~ All the best, Jon

          Reply
          • Mai Bui
            Mai Bui says:

            Good morning, Jon.

            Thank you so much for the response. I hope you don’t mind if I have two follow up questions:

            1. What gauges would you recommend for the hybrids you’ve mentioned? Tensions? Right now, I am hitting 52 with X-one but thinking of going up to 55.

            2. IF I were to use X-one as mains and ploy as crosses, I have same questions as number one. What do I get out of this set up?

            Many thanks again, Jon. Have an awesome day.

            Mai

          • TennisCompanion
            TennisCompanion says:

            Hey Mai,

            No problem! This is great conversation :)

            Question #1
            For your first question around gauge, I’d recommend you check out my article on Tennis String Gauge & It’s Impact on Performance. Basically, it’s a trade off between durability and spin potential. The lower the gauge or thicker the string the more durable and generally speaking the less feel/spin. The higher the gauge the less durable and more feel/spin you’ll get.

            For me personally, I’d string X-One a little bit thicker at 16 gauge and one of the polyesters at 17 gauge. I tend to break a lot of strings which can get expensive so I compensate for that with the higher gauge. If I was focused entirely on performance I’d string X-One at 17 gauge and the polyester at 18 gauge.

            As for tension, you may want to check out my article on Enhance Your Game with the Right Tennis String Tension. For X-One you probably don’t need to change that tension but if you do increase the tension you’ll be increasing control and decreasing power. My thought would be to stick with 52 if you’re comfortable with that to start.

            For the polyester, you’re going to want to consider dropping the string tension 5-10% from your typical 52 lbs. A good place to start might be around 49 lbs or roughly 6% lower than your 52 lb tension. Polyester strings are stiffer and tend to perform well at lower tensions, but with a hybrid setup, I’d tend to avoid dropping the polyester string too far where I’ve found things can get a little funky when there’s too large a variance between the two different types of string.

            Question #2
            Generally speaking the string you place in the mains will dominate the overall feel of your racquet. Therefore, using the polyester as the mains will provide you with less power and more control/durability. On the other hand, using X-One in the mains will provide you with more power, comfort, feel and subsequently less control/durability.

            Looking back at one of my previous comment above it looks like I minced my words. I suggested X-One in the crosses and the polyester in the mains. Based on your comments about your elbow problem you’d likely be better off with X-One in the mains and the polyester in the crosses. Sorry for any confusion there.

            In summary, here’s my recommendation – of course, hopefully, based on the information I provided you can tweak this to your preference if needed 😃

            • X-One at 16 gauge in mains at 52 lbs
            • Polyester at 17 gauge in crosses at 49 lbs

            ~ All the best, Jon

    • Mai
      Mai says:

      Anant.

      Once you give X-One Biphase or NRG 2 a try, you’ll find it nearly impossible to go back to your regular string. The strings are soft with power and great feel. If you have a long and aggressive swing with heavy top spin, I’d recommend the lower gauge.

      Have fun,

      Mai

      Reply

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